FatherlessnessStaying informed is half the battle...

 
85% of all children that exhibit behavioral disorders come from fatherless homes
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Category: Fatherlessness
90% of all homeless and runaway children are from fatherless homes
U.S. Census Bureau
Category: Fatherlessness
71% of all high school dropouts come from fatherless homes
National Principals Association Report on the State of High Schools
Category: Fatherlessness
75% of all adolescent patients in chemical abuse centers come from fatherless homes
Rainbows for all God's Children
Category: Fatherlessness
63% of youth suicides are from fatherless homes
U.S. Census Bureau
Category: Fatherlessness
80% of rapists motivated with displaced anger come from fatherless homes
Criminal Justice & Behavior, Vol 14, p. 403-26, 1978
Category: Fatherlessness
70% of juveniles in state-operated institutions come from fatherless homes
U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988
Category: Fatherlessness
85% of all youths sitting in prisons grew up in a fatherless home
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 5 times more likely to commit suicide.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 32 times more likely to run away.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 20 times more likely to have behavioral disorders.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 14 times more likely to commit rape.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 9 times more likely to drop out of high school.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 10 times more likely to abuse chemical substances.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 9 times more likely to end up in a state-operated institution.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Children from a fatherless home are 20 times more likely to end up in prison.
Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992
Category: Fatherlessness
Daughters of single parents are 53% more likely to marry as teenagers, 164% more likely to have a premarital birth, and 92% more likely to dissolve their own marriages. All these intergenerational consequences of single motherhood increase the likelihood of chronic welfare dependency.
Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Atlantic Monthly (April 1993)
Category: Fatherlessness
Daughters of single parents are 2.1 times more likely to have children during their teenage years than are daughters from intact families.
The Good Family Man, David Blankenhorn.
Category: Fatherlessness
71% of teenage pregnancies are to children of single parents.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services states that there were more than 1,000,000 documented child abuse cases in 1990. In 1983, it found that 60% of perpetrators were women with sole custody. Shared parenting can significantly reduce the stress associated with sole custody, and reduce the isolation of children in abusive situations by allowing both parents' to monitor the children's health and welfare and to protect them.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
Children in father-absent homes are five times more likely to be poor. In 2002, 7.8% of children in married-couple families were living in poverty,
U.S. Census Bureau
Category: Fatherlessness
In 1996, young children living with unmarried mothers were five times as likely to be poor and ten times as likely to be extremely poor.
National Center for children in Poverty
Category: Fatherlessness
Almost 75% of American children living in single-parent families will experience poverty before they turn 11 years old. Only 20 percent of children in two-parent families will do the same.
National Commission on Children
Category: Fatherlessness
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services states, "Fatherless children are at a dramatically greater risk of drug and alcohol abuse."
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
Children growing up in single-parent households are at a significantly increased risk for drug abuse as teenagers.
Denton, Rhonda E. and Charlene M. Kampfe. "The relationship Between Family Variables and Adolescent Substance Abuse: A literature Review."
Category: Fatherlessness
Children who live apart from their fathers are 4.3 times more likely to smoke cigarettes as teenagers than children growing up with their fathers in the home.
Stanton, Warren R., Tian P.S. Oci and Phil A. Silva. "Sociodemographic characteristics of Adolescent Smokers." The International Journal of the Addictions 7 (1994):
Category: Fatherlessness
Unmarried mothers are less likely to obtain prenatal care and more likely to have a low birthweight baby. Researchers find that these negative effects persist even when they take into account factors, such as parental education, that often distinguish single-parent from two-parent families.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
A study on nearly 6,000 children found that children from single parent homes had more physical and mental health problems than children who lived with two married parents. Additionally, boys in single parent homes were found to have more illnesses than girls in single parent homes.
Hong, Gong-Soog and Shelly L. White-Means."Do Working Mothers Have Healthy Children?" Journal of Family and Economic Issues 14
Category: Fatherlessness
Children in single-parent families are two to three times as likely as children in two-parent families to have emotional and behavioral problems.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
Three out of four teenage suicides occur in households where a parent has been absent.
Elshtain, Jean Bethke."Family Matters: The Plight of America's Children." The Christian Century
Category: Fatherlessness
In studies involving over 25,000 children using nationally representative data sets, children who lived with only one parent had lower grade point averages, lower college aspirations, poor attendance records, and higher drop out rates than students who lived with both parents.
McLanahan, Sara and Gary Sandefur. Growing up with a Single Parent: What Hurts, What Helps. Cambridge: Harvard University
Category: Fatherlessness
After taking into account race, socioeconomic status, sex, age, and ability, high school students from single-parent households were 1.7 times more likely to drop out than were their corresponding counterparts living with both biological parents.
McNeal, Ralph B. Jr."Extracurricular Activities and High School Dropouts." Sociology of Education
Category: Fatherlessness
School children from divorced families are absent more, and more anxious, hostile, and withdrawn, and are less popular with their peers than those from intact families.
One-Parent Families and Their Children: The School's Most Significant Minority. The Consortium for the Study of School Needs of Children from One-Parent Families. National Association of elementary School Principals and the Institute for Development of Educational Activities, a division of the Charles f. Kettering Foundation. Arlington, VA
Category: Fatherlessness
Children in single parent families are more likely to be in trouble with the law than their peers who grow up with two parents.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
In a study using a national probability sample of 1,636 young men and women, it was found that older boys and girls from female headed households are more likely to commit criminal acts than their peers who lived with two parents.
Heimer, Karen. "Gender, Interaction, and Delinquency: Testing a Theory of Differential Social Control." Social Psychology Quarterly 59
Category: Fatherlessness
Adolescent females between the ages of 15 and 19 years reared in homes without fathers are significantly more likely to engage in premarital sex than adolescent females reared in homes with both a mother and a father.
Billy, John O. G., Karin L. Brewster and William R. Grady. "Contextual Effects on the Sexual Behavior of Adolescent Women." Journal of Marriage and Family 56
Category: Fatherlessness
Children in single parent families are more likely to get pregnant as teenagers than their peers who grow up with two parents.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Category: Fatherlessness
A white teenage girl from an advantaged background is five times more likely to become a teen mother if she grows up in a single-mother household than if she grows up in a household with both biological parents.
hitehead, Barbara Dafoe. "Facing the Challenges of Fragmented Families." The Philanthropy Roundtable 9.1
Category: Fatherlessness
70% of long-term prison inmates grew up in homes with no father present.
U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988
Category: Fatherlessness
72% of adolescent murderers grew up without fathers.
U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988
Category: Fatherlessness
The likelihood that a young male will engage in criminal activity doubles if he is raised without a father and triples if he lives in a neighborhood with a high concentration of single-parent families.
Howard Center For Families
Category: Fatherlessness
Children living apart from their biological fathers are up to 75% more likely to have to repeat a grade of school and 70% more likely to be expelled from school than children living with both parents.
Howard Center For Families
Category: Fatherlessness
Boys who grow up in father-absent homes are more likely that those in father-present homes to have trouble establishing appropriate sex roles and gender identity.
P.L. Adams, J.R. Milner, and N.A. Schrepf, Fatherless Children, New York, Wiley Press, 1984
Category: Fatherlessness